Finding Trigger Foods – Dr Mark Hyman

This weeks blog comes from Dr. Mark Hyman author of Eat Fat, Get Thin. I really enjoyed this article and decided to share it here as well. When we are looking at Trigger foods you have to be diligent in following a protocol like the one Dr. Hyman lays out to verify if the food actually triggers your body. Remember you are an individual and different foods will affect you in different ways even if other family members have the same food sensitivity.

Finding Trigger Foods, – Dr Mark Hyman

Julie, an Eat Fat, Get Thin challenge participant, is curious about transitioning off of a program and onto every day eating.  She asks, “How do I get a good read on whether certain foods are OK for me? What’s the best indicator that a food is good or not good?”

Normally, when I work with patients, I put them on an elimination diet. We get rid of specific trigger foods such as gluten, dairy, grains, sugar, alcohol and caffeine. This is a way for your body to hit the reset button on your health. After following an elimination diet for a certain period of time, you might want to add foods back in to see if you can tolerate them.

The key to determining food sensitivities (as opposed to food allergies) is that the food sensitivity might have a slow response or reaction. We’re talking about symptoms like bloating, brain fog, poor sleep, poor digestion, skin rashes – these symptoms can all be caused by food sensitivities.

When you’re adding foods back in, give yourself three to four days with each food and be sure to choose low-risk foods. For example, if you want to test out grains, test out whole grains like brown rice. If you want to test out dairy, try sheep or goat products first.

Food sensitivities might affect you immediately or it might take a few days. That’s why I recommend sticking to one food for three days, versus adding in all potential trigger foods at once. Then, give yourself one to two days before adding in another potential trigger food so you can see how your body responds to the previous addition. I know this seems like a long process, but it is truly the only way to know how individual foods are affecting you. More from Dr. Mark Hyman here